Additional notes (click to expand)

Medicinal

Culpeper: says of the flowers: ‘Clove-gilliflowers, resist the pestilence, strengthen the heart, liver and stomach, and provokes lust.’
Culpeper, Nicholas. (1650). A Physical Directory . London, Peter Cole.

Nomenclature

Clove gilliflowers
Culpeper, Nicholas. (1650). A Physical Directory . London, Peter Cole.

Other use

They smell strongly of cloves, and an oil made from the petals is used in perfumery, soaps etc. The petals are sometimes used as a garnish for salads. In herbal medicine they are used to make a tonic.
Oakeley, Dr. H. F. . (2013). The Gardens of the Pharmacopoeia Londinensis. link

Dianthus caryophyllus L. Caryophyllaceae Carnation, clove-gilliflowers - Mediterranean Culpeper (1650) writes that ‘Clove-gilliflowers, resist the pestilence, strengthen the heart, liver and stomach, and provokes lust.’ They smell strongly of cloves, and an oil made from the petals is used in perfumery, soaps etc. The petals are sometimes used as a garnish for salads. In herbal medicine they are used to make a tonic.
Oakeley, Dr. Henry F. (2013). Wellcome Library notes. link

Geographical distribution

  • Europe, Southwestern Europe, France

Dianthus caryophyllus L.

Family: CARYOPHYLLACEAE
Genus: Dianthus
Species: caryophyllus L.
Common names: Carnation; Clove pink, Border carnation
Pharmacopoeia Londinensis name: Caryophylli
Distribution summary: probable origin mediterranean
Habit: Perennial
Hardiness: H3 - Half hardy; unheated greenhouse/mild winter
Habitat: Dry limestone soils
Garden status: Currently grown
Garden location: Pharmacopoeia Londinensis 1618 'Flowers' (HSE 1B), Europe & Mediterranean (E)
Flowering months: July, August
Reason for growing: Medicinal


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