Additional notes (click to expand)

Commemorative

Named for Rev. Adam Buddle (1660-1715) English botanist and vicar of Farmbridge in Essex.
Stearn, W.T. (1996). Dictionary of Plant Names for Gardeners. Cassell.

Medicinal

A decoction of roots provides a remedy for cough and for relief of colic while an infusion of the leaves is applied as an eye lotion.
www.plantzafrica.com http://pza.sanbi.org/buddleja-salviifolia link

Toxicity

Although not common there are a number of reports of people who have developed acute skin rashes, urticaria and wheezing after working with Buddleia plants. Please note: there is no information as to which species provoke this reaction.

Geographical distribution

  • Africa, East Tropical Africa, Tanzania
  • Africa, South Tropical Africa, Malawi
  • Africa, South Tropical Africa, Mozambique
  • Africa, South Tropical Africa, Zambia
  • Africa, South Tropical Africa, Zimbabwe
  • Africa, Southern Africa, Cape Provinces
  • Africa, Southern Africa, Free State
  • Africa, Southern Africa, KwaZulu-Natal
  • Africa, Southern Africa, Lesotho
  • Africa, Southern Africa, Northern Provinces
  • Africa, Southern Africa, Swaziland

Buddleja salviifolia (L.) Lam.

Family: BUDDLEJACEAE
Genus: Buddleja
Species: salviifolia (L.) Lam.
Common names: South African Sagewood
Distribution summary: Africa
Habit: Shrub
Hardiness: H4 - Hardy; average winter
Habitat: Woodland, forest margins, ravines
Garden status: Currently grown
Garden location: Southern Hemisphere Wolfson bed (N)
Flowering months: July, August
Reason for growing: Commemorative, medicinal, toxic


Back to List